It's the end of the year and you are running out of time to use your benefits! Did you know your vision plan and Flex Spending Accounts (FSA) may reset at the first of the year? Did you know that you could use FSA and HSA (Health Savings Accounts) for eye exams AND materials like glasses, contacts, and sunglasses? Well, there is no better time than the present to take advantage of your benefits: Now through December 31st, BUY ONE complete set of frame and lenses, GET ONE complete set of frame and lens FREE! Some exclusions apply and sales may not be combined with insurance, however, we have specials for patients using insurance as well. Call our office today to schedule your eye exam!

Eye Anatomy 101

Image of the anatomy of a human eye.

The eye has many parts that work together to create vision. The eyes themselves are only part of “seeing.” The brain is also involved. The eyes, though, begin the complex process of vision by gathering, focusing and passing on visual information to the brain.

To help you learn how the eye works, here is a quick overview of the anatomy of the eye. This information is also useful in understanding which parts of the eye are affected by different health problems of the eye.

Cornea. Light first enters the eye through this transparent, dome-shaped surface that covers the front of the eye. The cornea bends — or refracts — the light onto the eye’s lens.

Pupil. This is the round hole at the front of the eye that appears black. It is located behind the middle of the cornea and is surrounded by the iris.

Iris. The iris, or the colored part of the eye surrounding the pupil, controls how much light enters the eye. The iris can make the pupil bigger or smaller by opening or closing.

Lens. Behind the pupil and the iris is a transparent structure that looks similar in shape to the lens of a magnifying glass. Unlike glass lenses, though, this part of the eye can change shape. This enables it to bend the rays of light even more, so they land in the right place on the retina, at the back of the eye.

Vitreous body, or gel. The eye is filled with a gel that helps it keep its round shape. Light entering the eye first passes through the cornea then the lens and then the vitreous body before reaching the retina.

Retina. At the back of the eye is the retina, or a thin layer of light-sensitive nerve cells. The retina contains different types of photoreceptors — called rods and cones — which respond to light that lands on them.

Cones. These light-sensitive nerve cells are located in the macula, which is located at the center of the retina. Cones are necessary for focused central vision. Cones also enable you to see colors in bright-light conditions.

Rods. These light-sensitive nerve cells surround the macula and extend to the edge of the retina. The rods provide you with your side, or peripheral, vision. They also help you see at night and in dim light.

Optic nerve. The cells of the retina turn light into electrical impulses. These electrical signals are collected by the optic nerve — a bundle of about 1 million nerve fibers — and transmitted to the brain. The brain puts all this information together to produce the image that you see.

To learn more about eye anatomy or to have your eye health examined, please contact our practice.

Contact us to request an appointment today.

BOGO FREE Pair with purchase one complete pair, Patients with Insurance receive 30% off Second pair

Testimonials

  • While vacationing in Orange Beach, I had something that jabbed me in the eye and punctured my cornea. I called the Orange Beach office and they got me in quickly. The staff was so friendly and helpful. Dr. Leonard explained things very well and put me at ease. Hats off...

    - Jason N. - Google Review
  • I have been going to Dr. Leonard for over 20 years. She always gives me the best honest answers &/or suggestions. I trust her to the fullest. I now take my 3 year old daughter to Dr. Leonard as well. My eye insurance isn’t accepted there anymore but I don’t...

    - Dae P. - Google Review
  • Everyone has such a warm personality that it makes you feel like a friend! Excellent service....

    - Rosaly T. - Google Review
  • I am here @ Orange beach for vacation & one of my contacts washed away in the ocean. My family and I are from Texas, so I called the very next day. I literally had a pair of contacts waiting on me in 5 minutes to be picked up. Ms....

    - Lauren G. - Google Review
  • I was very impressed by the Dr. and staff at Coastal Family Eyecare. From the moment I walked through the door I was met with professional, caring and very knowledgeable people. I highly recommend them and will be returning for all my future vision needs....

    - Maureen M. - Google Review

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Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Orange Beach Office

Monday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

CLOSED FOR THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY

Friday

CLOSED FOR THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY

Saturday

Closed

Sunday

Closed

Pensacola Office

Monday

Closed

Tuesday

Closed

Wednesday

Closed

Thursday

Closed

Friday

Closed

Saturday

Closed

Sunday

Closed

Orange Beach Office

Monday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Tuesday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Wednesday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
CLOSED FOR THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY
Friday
CLOSED FOR THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY
Saturday
Closed
Sunday
Closed

Pensacola Office

Monday
Closed
Tuesday
Closed
Wednesday
Closed
Thursday
Closed
Friday
Closed
Saturday
Closed
Sunday
Closed

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